John Charles Cutler

John Charles Cutler ( Cleveland , 29 of June of 1915 – Pittsburgh , 8 of February of 2003 ) was a surgeon American best known for leading a research program on sexually transmitted infections in the Public Health Service of the United States .

The Mengele American

As director of the US national program, Dr. Cutler conducted a series of controversial medical experiments. The most known are:

  • The experiments on syphilis in Guatemala (1946-1948) – syphilis was inoculated to about 1300 men, women and children; Y
  • The Tuskegee experiment (1932-1972) – for 40 years, 400 black families in the town of Macon (Alabama, southern United States), who were already sick with syphilis, were kept cheating, providing placebos instead of treatment- . 1

Legacy

In 2010, US President Barak Obama commissioned the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethics to analyze what happened between 1946 and 1948 in Guatemala . The commission came to the conclusion that Cutler and the other investigators knew they were violating ethical standards:

There was a clear and deliberate effort to deceive the subjects of the experiments, the scientific community and the community at large.

The commission found that Dr. Cutler exposed more than 1,300 individuals – men, women and children – to venereal diseases, through direct contact with infected persons or inoculation, but only treated 700 people, leaving the Rest, resulting in the death of 83 people 2

References

  1. Back to top↑ Monge, Yolanda (2010): “Doctors of the United States inoculated syphilis and gonorrhea to prisoners and mental patients of Guatemala” , article of October 1, 2010 in the newspaper El País (Madrid). Accessed November 2, 2010.
  2. Back to top↑ «A glimpse of justice 65 years later. Macabre experiment in Guatemala ” , article in the newspaper El Espectador . Accessed August 31, 2011.