Führer General Headquarters

The Führer ( German : Führerhauptquartiere ), abbreviated FHQ , is the common name of official headquarters used by the Nazi leader Adolf Hitler and several German commanders and officials from throughout Europe during World War II . 1 Perhaps the best known is the seat of Führerbunker of Berlin , where Hitler committed suicide on 30 of April of 1945 .

Other notable headquarters are Wolfsschanze ( Wolf ‘s Lair ) in East Prussia , where he failed the conspiracy led by Claus von Stauffenberg to assassinate Hitler on 20 of July of 1944 , and the private home of Hitler, the Berghof in Obersalzberg , near Berchtesgaden , where he frequently met with prominent national and foreign officials.

Location of the General Barracks

The Kehlsteinhaus (“Eagle’s Nest”) (above) and the tunnel entrance to the elevator that goes up to it. It was associated with the Berghof which became part of the Obersalzberg military complex near Berchtesgaden . Photograph of 1945.
The location of the Führerbunker and Vorbunker in Berlin, 1945.

There were fourteen Führer General Headquarters completed (over 20 planned): 2

First name Alternative Designations Location Beginning of the works Finalized Used as Headquarters
Adlerhorst 3 Mühle (OT)
Bauvorhaben Z
Lager K
Bauvorhaben C
Bad Nauheim , Germany September 1, 1939 Yes Yes – used by Hitler during the Battle of the Ardennes
Anlage Mitte 3 Askania Mitte Tomaszów Mazowiecki , Poland December 1, 1940 Yes Yes – industrial only
Anlage Riese 2 Do not Wałbrzych , Poland October 1943 Do not Do not
Anlage Süd 3 Askania Süd Strzyżów , Poland October 1, 1940 Yes Yes – Hitler met Mussolini here on 27 and 28 August 1941 3
Berghof 2 /
Eagle’s Nest
Do not Obersalzberg , Berchtesgaden , Germany What? Yes Yes – the Allies thought it might have been the Alpenfestung (‘Alpine fortress’), the last Nazi stronghold, in which the last fighting would take place
Bärenhöhle 4 Do not Smolensk , Russia October 1, 1941 Yes No – used only by Army Group Center
Felsennest 5 Do not Rodert, Bad Münstereifel , Germany 1940 Yes Yes – used by Hitler during the Battle of France in May 1940
Führerbunker 6 Do not Berlin , Germany 1936/1943 Yes Yes – Hitler committed suicide here in 1945
Führersonderzug 1 (Special Train)
‘Amerika’, ‘Brandenburg’
Miscellaneous (mobile) 1939? Yes Yes
Olga 2 Do not 200 km north of Minsk , Belarus July 1, 1943 Do not Do not
S III 2 Wolfsturm, Olga, etc. Ohrdruf , Germany Fall of 1944 (?) Do not Do not
Siegfried 2 Do not Pullach , Germany What? What? What?
Tannenberg 7 Do not Freudenstadt / Kniebis , Germany October 1, 1939 Yes Yes (27 June – 5 July 1940)
W3 Do not Saint-Rimay by Vendôme , France May 1, 1942 Do not Do not
Waldwiese 4 Do not Glan-Münchweiler , Germany October 1, 1939 Yes Do not
Wasserburg 4 Do not Pskow (Pleskau), Russia November 1, 1942 Yes No (assigned to Army Group North )
Wehrwolf 3 Eichenhain Vinnytsia , Ukraine November 1, 1941 Yes Yes
Wolfsschanze 8 Askania Nord, «Lobo del Lobo» Kętrzyn (Rastenburg), Poland December 1, 1940 Yes Yes – place of the attack of 20 of July of 1944
Wolfsschlucht I 9 Do not Brûly-de-Pesche, near Couvin , Belgium May 1, 1940 Yes Yes
Wolfsschlucht II 3 W2 Margival , France September 1, 1942 Yes Yes
Zigeuner 2 Brunhilde Thionville , France April 1, 1944 Yes Yes

See also

  • Architecture of Nazi Germany
  • Führerbunker
  • SS-Begleitkommando des Führers

References

  1. ↑ Jump to:a b Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , Introduction and p. 1.
  2. ↑ Jump to:a b c d e f g Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , p. 2.
  3. ↑ Jump to:a b c d e f Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , pp. 48-51.
  4. ↑ Jump to:a b c Der Kommandant Führerhauptquartier from Das Bundesarchiv (German, www.bundesarchiv.de).
  5. Back to top↑ Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , p. Four.
  6. Back to top↑ The Berlin Führerbunker: The Thirteenth Hole, After the Battle , No.61 Special Edition (entire).
  7. Back to top↑ Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , p. 18.
  8. Back to top↑ Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , p. 28.
  9. Back to top↑ Raiber, Richard, Guide to Hitler’s Headquarters, After The Battle, No.19 , p. 10.