David Myatt

David Myatt (n. 1950), also known as David Wulstan Myatt and as Abdelaziz ibn Myatt is an activist British , old convert to Islam, former theoretical Nazi theorist of thought of the “numinous way” ( numinous way ).

Biography

David Myatt was born in Tanzania , where his father was an official of the British colonial administration. Later, the family moved to the Far East , where Myatt studied martial arts . 1 In 1967, he moved to England to complete his schooling, until he dropped out of school to focus on political activism .

Activism

In 1968, Myatt joined the British National Movement ( British Movement ) newly founded by Colin Jordan , and occasionally acted as his bodyguard at meetings and rallies. 2 During the 70s and even 90s kept involved in organizations paramilitary and neo – Nazis as Column Combat 88 and 18, 3 4 militancy for which he was twice imprisoned for violent crimes. 1

He co-founded alongside Edward Morrison, the neo-Nazi organization National Democratic Freedom Movement, “whose aim was to free assets, protect them and make some money for the initial purpose of helping our political struggle” 5 and who was active in the city of Leeds early 70. 3 Myatt was arrested by police in the county of Yorkshire and imprisoned by management in May of a qualified by the far – right John Tyndall of “criminal gang” movement. 6

He also co – founded the also neo – Nazi group Reichsfolk, 7 8 that “sought to create a new elite aria , the” Legion of Adolf Hitler “and pave the way for a golden age that would replace” the disgusting and decadent present, with its dishonorable values And their weak and unworthy individuals. ” 3

In the early 1980s he attempted to establish a rural community in the English county of Shropshire , according to Myatt, based on the National Socialist principles of “blood and soil” 5 and linked by critical observers with some form of Nazi occultism . Referring to Fig.

In the mid-1990s, Myatt founded and was the first leader of a National Socialist Movement. 10

According to George Michael, 1998 Myatt assumed leadership of the Combat 18 paramilitary organization after the imprisonment for murder of the previous leader, Charles Sargent. 1

«Practical guide to the Aryan Revolution»

In November 1997, Myatt published a pamphlet entitled Practical Guide to the Aryan Revolution on the Internet, which included such headings as “Murder”, “Bombings” and “Racial War”. 11 According to Michael Whine of the British Council of Deputies, “the content provided a step-by-step guide to a terrorist insurrection with advice on assassination targets, theoretical grounds for the bombing and sabotage campaigns, and combat”. In February 1998, Scotland Yard detectives raided Myatt’s home in Worcestershire and seized their computers and files. Myatt was arrested and charged with incitement to murder and racial hatred, 12 but the case was dismissed for insufficient evidence provided by Canadian Jewish institutions. eleven

It has been argued that Myatt’s pamphlet influenced 13 in the 1999 actions of David Copeland (“the London Nails Bomber”), also a member of the Myatt National Socialist Movement, which bombed areas of the British capital frequented by blacks , Asian and gay , killing three people and a nasciturus . 14

Conversion to Islam and Jihadism

Myatt converted to Islam in 1998. According to university professor George Michael, he made the decision working on a farm in England, moved by a feeling of affinity with nature and impressed by the militancy of Islamist groups, believing that he shared common enemies with Islam, in particular “the West of consumer capitalism and international finance “. 1 After his conversion, Myatt-which took the name of Abdul-Aziz ibn Myatt-dissociated himself from nationalism and racism to condemn racism in the name of Islam.

Myatt traveled and lectured in various Arab countries , and wrote one of the most detailed defenses published in English suicide bombings Islamists and the murder of civilians in such actions. 15 He claimed to support Osama bin Laden and the Taliban , 1 and called the Jewish genocide during World War II ” hoax” . 16 Israeli political scientist Ely Karmon argued in a 2005 NATO task force that Myatt had called “all enemies of the Zionists to join the jihad ” against the Jews and the United States . 17

According to an article published in The Times on April 24, 2006, Myatt believed that “the pure and authentic Islam of rebirth, which recognizes practical jihad as a duty, is the only force capable of combating and destroying dishonor, arrogance And the materialism of the West … For the West, nothing is sacred except perhaps the Zionists, Zionism, the assembly of the so-called Holocaust and the idols that worship or pretend to worship the West and its lackeys, like democracy … Jihad is Our duty. If the nationalists, or some of them, wish to help us, they can do the right thing, the honorable, and become, return to Islam, accepting the superiority of Islam over each and every one of the ways of the West. ” 16

Abandonment of Islam

In 2010, Myatt claimed to have abandoned Islam after developing his own worldview , 5 of which he wrote that “Pathei-Mathos’s path is an ethical, inner, personal, non-political, non-interfering and non-religious path, Individual, individual change and empathic life, in which there is an awareness of the importance of virtues such as compassion, humility, tolerance, kindness and love. 18

External links

  • This work contains a partial translation derived from David Myatt of Wikipedia in English, specifically of this version of the 29 of December of 2013 , published by its publishers under the GNU Free Documentation License and the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license .

References

  1. ↑ Jump to:a b c d e Michael, George (2006). The enemy of my enemy: the alarming convergence of militant Islam and the extreme right (in English) . University Press of Kansas. P. 142. ISBN  0-7006-1444-3 .
  2. Back to top↑ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas (2000). Hitler’s Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth and Neo-Nazism (in English) . New York University Press. P. 215.
  3. ↑ Jump to:a b c Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas (2002). Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism and the Politics of Identity (in English) . New York: New York University Press. Pp. 215-217. ISBN  0-8147-3124-4 .
  4. Back to top↑ Lowles, Nick (2001). White Riot: The Violent Story of Combat 18 (in English) . Milo Books.
  5. ↑ Jump to:a b c d Myatt, David (2013). Myngath: Some Recollections of a Wyrdful and Extremist Life (in English) . CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. ISBN  978-1484110744 . Accessed January 2, 2014 .
  6. Back to top↑ Tyndall, John (April 1983). Spearhead .
  7. Back to top↑ Kaplan, Jeffrey (2000). «David Wulstan Myatt» . Encyclopedia of White Power. A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right (in English) . Walnut Creek (California): AltaMira Press. ISBN  978-0742503403 .
  8. Back to top↑ Taguieff, Pierre-André (2004). Prêcheurs de haine. Traversée de la judéophobie planétaire (in French) . Paris: Mille et une Nuits. ISBN  978-2842057206 .
  9. Back to top↑ JR Wright (November 2010). “The Promethean Peregrinations of David Myatt” (in English) . Accessed January 2, 2014 .
  10. Back to top↑ Sołtysiak, Arkadiusz (2010). Anthropology religii (in Polish) . Warsaw: Instytut Archeologii UW. Pp. 173-182.
  11. ↑ Jump to:a b Vacca, John (2005). Computer Forensics: Computer Crime Scene Investigation . Charles River Media. P. 420. ISBN  1-58450-389-0 .
  12. Back to top↑ Michael Whine (May 5, 1999). «Cyberspace. A New Medium for Communication, Command and Control by Extremists . International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (in English) . Accessed January 2, 2014 .
  13. Back to top↑ Weitzman, Mark (2006). ‘Antisemitismus und Holocaust-Leugnung: Permanent Element in the Rechtsextremismus’. In Thomas Greven. Globalisierter Rechtsextremismus? Die extremistische Rechte der der Ära der Globalisierung (in German) . VS Verlag für Sozialwissenschaften. Pp. 61-64. ISBN  978-3531145143 .
  14. Back to top↑ «Panorama. “The Nailbomber ” ” (in English) . 30 June 2000 . Accessed January 2, 2014 .
  15. Back to top↑ Weitzmann, Mark (2010). Anti-Semitism and Terrorism. In Hans-Liudger Dienel. Terrorism and the Internet: Threats, Target Groups, Deradicalisation Strategies (in English) . IOS Press. ISBN  978-1-60750-536-5 .
  16. ↑ Jump to:a b Woolcock, Nicola; Dominic Kennedy (April 24, 2006). «What the neo-Nazi fanatic did next: switched to Islam» . The Times (in English) . Accessed January 2, 2014 .
  17. Back to top↑ Ely Karmon (July 26, 2005). “The Middle East, Iraq, Palestine – Arenas for Radical and Anti-Globalization Groups Activity” (in English) . International Institute for Counter-Terrorism . Accessed January 2, 2014 .
  18. Back to top↑ David Myatt (October 2012). “Conspectus of the Philosophy of Pathei-Mathos” (in English) . Accessed January 2, 2014 .